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Business in Vancouver: Corvus Energy’s marine power focus pays dividends

Business in Vancouver: Corvus Energy’s marine power focus pays dividends

Richmond battery maker doubled its revenue between fiscal 2015 and 2016, topping BIV’s list of fastest-growing companies

By Aug. 25, 2016, Business in Vancouver

Given the exuberance around Tesla electric cars, it might have been tempting for a new clean-tech company specializing in rechargeable lithium-ion batteries to try to crack the electric vehicle market.

But from the outset, Corvus Energy focused primarily on marine applications – ferries and ships.

The Richmond-based company’s recent growth figures vindicate that focus. In just seven years, it has come to dominate the market for lithium-ion batteries for the marine sector, particularly in northern Europe, where more and more ferries and ships are running either partially or entirely on battery power.

“We’ve got the largest install base, by far, in marine – something approaching 70% of the installed base in the marine and offshore world is Corvus,” said Corvus CEO Andrew Morden.

Corvus tops this year’s Business in Vancouver list of fastest-growing companies. Over a five-year period, the company’s revenue has grown from $123,917 in 2011 to $6 million in 2015. Its revenues doubled from $6 million in fiscal 2015 to $11.5 million in fiscal 2016.

Founded in 2009, the company focused on developing batteries that could withstand the wet, corrosive environment of the ocean. Some of the original founders have since left to start a rival company, and the two companies are now involved in a legal dispute.

“They have started a competing entity and we are actually litigating against that entity,” Morden said. “Our view is that they’ve copied a material amount of our intellectual property.”

In 2011, Corvus received $582,467 from Sustainable Development Technology Canada (SDTC) for a hybrid electric ferry demonstration project in Norway. The SDTC funding helped leverage another $1.1 million in private funding and attract two large corporate investors.

Since then, it has come to dominate the marine market.

“We consider the project to be one of our success stories because it’s an elegant yet robust and versatile solution, especially for the incredible demands of the marine environment,” said SDTC public affairs manager Gillian Cartwright.

One of the keys to Corvus’ success was being first to market.

“The value proposition for the use of lithium ion batteries is compelling for the marine and offshore industry,” Morden said. “That market is a relatively big market. We were first to market. We were able to get market traction and, as there’s been more and more adoption, we’ve been able to ride that wave up.”

Corvus’ largest shareholder is the Oslo shipping giant BW Group. The second-largest investor is the venture arm of Statoil ASA (NYSE:STO), Norway’s national oil company.

Although the marine market is the mainstay of Corvus’ business, it has also supplied lithium-ion batteries for a number of other transportation sectors, including trains, trucks and submarines.

Morden describes his company’s approach to markets as “hourglass shaped.” It started out providing batteries for a variety of markets, narrowed in on the marine sector, mostly in Northern Europe, and is now branching out again to other “verticals” and geographic markets – notably China.

“We’ve just released our next generation of the product, which is a material change in the technology and in the thinking around the technology, and that’s expanded our horizons,” Morden said. “So now we are much more active in pursuing new verticals.”

That new generation of batteries is the Orca ESS platform, with two main product lines. One produces more power and can recharge faster, while the other can store more energy.

One Chinese port is now using Corvus batteries instead of diesel generators to power gantry cranes, and Morden said there is a big potential market for energy storage in offshore wind farms.

A number of pilot projects have also used Corvus batteries to power trains and light-rail systems.

Northern Europe – particularly Norway – has been Corvus’ most important market. Northern European countries not only have a lot of ferry traffic, due to their geography, but they also have a lot of hydro power, so it makes a lot of sense to power ferries with rechargeable batteries. Norway is such an important market that Corvus has opened an office there.

Although there has been less uptake in Canada, one company that has become a Corvus customer is Seaspan Ferries Corp., which is using Corvus batteries in two new ferries under construction that will run on liquefied natural gas and battery power.

As for the company’s head count, it has actually fallen – from a peak of 70 down to 45 – as it has moved from demonstration to commercialization.

“One of the tricks for us is to grow our revenue without growing our head count,” Morden said. “It’s more about having the right people in the right place.”

 

https://www.biv.com/article/2016/8/corvus-energys-marine-power-focus-pays-dividends/

Next Generation Orca Energy ESS to Power Fish Farm Support Vessel

Next Generation Orca Energy ESS to Power Fish Farm Support Vessel

By MarEx

Grovfjord Mek. Verksted AS (GMV) has selected Corvus Energy as the supplier of the lithium ion based energy storage system (ESS) for a fish farm support vessel called GMV ZERO. GMV will utilize Corvus’ next generation Orca Energy ESS to support the vessel’s entire energy requirements for zero emission fish farm operation.

Orca Energy is part of the recently announced Orca ESS product line from Corvus which is specifically designed for maritime applications. “Our teams take great pride in the fact that our products are being applied to projects such as this one, with the goal of zero emission operations”, said Roger Rosvold, Sales Manager at Corvus. “In the past, there was a trade off between financial feasibility and environmental responsibility. That is no longer the case with the Orca ESS product line.” In addition to its compelling total cost of installation and the purpose built performance characteristics, the Orca product line also includes significant safety innovations. One such innovation is cell-level thermal runaway isolation which does not require an active cooling technique, such as liquid cooling, for it to be effective. With numerous leading innovations, Orca ESS is quickly becoming the industry’s safest & highest performing maritime ESS solution.

“As a result of an extensive evaluation, GMV selected Corvus’ Orca Energy ESS due to its ability to not only meet, but exceed all performance, safety and financial requirements”, said Arnold Hansen, GMV. “Beyond the incredible benefits of Orca ESS, GMV wanted a partner with extensive marine ESS experience, a global support team, and deep technical knowledge. Corvus is that partner.”

As the leading manufacturer of energy storage systems for maritime applications, Corvus designed and built the Orca ESS solutions portfolio based on the experience from 50+ vessels utilizing a Corvus ESS, totaling over 35MWh and 1 million operating hours. Rather than a single product, the Orca ESS product line delivers a range of products which are designed to meet the needs of various marine customers. Orca Energy is ideal for applications that require large amounts of energy such as ferries and merchant vessels, while Orca Power has been designed for applications that require a seamless response to dynamic power loads such as offshore supply vessels and port equipment.

Read more: http://maritime-executive.com/pressrelease/next-generation-orca-energy-ess-to-power-fish-farm-support-vessel

Corvus Energy Awarded Supplier of the Year

Corvus Energy Awarded Supplier of the Year

Andrew Morden_E&H_2016_Corvus Energy_Supplier of the Year Award_
Andrew Morden, Corvus Energy CEO

Corvus Energy selected as Supplier of the Year for the second consecutive year at the 2016 Electric & Hybrid Marine Awards

Richmond, B.C. – June 23, 2016 – Corvus Energy has been awarded ‘Supplier of the Year’ at the 2016 Electric & Hybrid Marine Awards being held at the Electric & Hybrid Marine World Expo in Amsterdam. This is the second consecutive year that Corvus has received this award which is decided up on by a panel of highly regarded industry experts.

The award was presented to Andrew Morden, Corvus Energy CEO, on the final day of a very busy and successful Electric & Hybrid Marine Expo taking place in Amsterdam. “We at Corvus are extremely delighted to have been selected once again as Supplier of the Year by the judging panel. Although it has become an industry full of new entrants, our determination and experience in building the best marine ESS products has been consistently recognized by industry experts”, said Morden. “The Orca ESS product launch earlier this week at the expo is representative of our teams’ focus and dedication to providing the maritime industry with the very best ESS solutions for all-electric and hybrid applications.”

Following the successful launch of Orca ESS, Corvus also announced 2 new projects this week that will utilize Orca Energy ESS. “It’s been another banner year for Corvus Energy. It’s hard to find a hybrid or electric marine power project that they don’t have a hand in” says John Snyder, editor-in-chief and publisher, Marine Log – and awards panel judge.

Corvus Energy has deployed more ESS solutions into maritime applications than anyone else in the industry. With 50+ vessels and over 35MWh installed, Corvus has unsurpassed experience and knowledge that enables revolutionary innovation. As recognized by another panel judge, “This company is a perfect example of successfully implementing innovations on a large scale” – Charles van den Oosterkamp, CEO, Yellow & Finch Publishers.

Corvus believes that lithium-ion based energy storage systems have a broader range of applications, within the maritime industry and beyond. The extensible platform which forms the basis of the Orca product line enables us to meet those requirements well into the future. Sam Chambers, editorial director, Asia Shipping Media & panel judge added, “Corvus is consistent, whatever the market”.

About Orca ESS

The Orca ESS product line was specifically designed and built to meet the needs of maritime applications at the industry’s highest levels of performance and safety, while making economic sense to ship owners and builders.

Rather than a single product approach, the Orca ESS product line delivers a range of products which are designed to meet the various needs of maritime customers. Orca Energy is ideal for applications that require large amounts of energy such as ferries and merchant vessels, while Orca Power was designed for applications that require a seamless response to dynamic power loads such as offshore supply vessels and port equipment.

 

With the industry’s highest C-Rates, unparalleled density and increased lifespan, Orca ESS solutions are designed to scale for applications of all sizes, up to and beyond 10MWh, at a lower total cost of ownership.

In addition to the superior performance and economic advantages, the purpose-built Orca product line also includes industry leading innovations related to safety and operations. Among those innovations, both Orca Energy and Orca Power feature patented-pending technology that delivers cell-level thermal runaway isolation. This unprecedented level of safety is standard across the Orca ESS product line and does not require active cooling techniques, such as liquid cooling for it to be effective. Additional innovations such as ‘blind-mate’ power connections contained within the rack, eliminate the need for cables and manual connections resulting in enhanced reliability, increased safety and reduced installation costs.

About Corvus Energy

Corvus Energy provides high power energy storage in the form of modular lithium ion battery systems. Its purpose built, field proven battery systems provide sustained power to hybrid and fully electric heavy industrial equipment, including large marine propulsion drives. For more information, please visit www.corvusenergy.com.

Media Contact:
Sean Puchalski

VP Strategic Marketing and Accounts
(604) 227-0280 ext. 123
spuchalski@corvusenergy.com

Work in progress

Work in progress

Commercialising energy storage systems in the maritime sector is a challenging proposition. Sean Puchalski discusses the evolution of battery-powered vessels and explains how Corvus Energy is working to scale up the technology for use on larger vessel types

Currently, the adoption of an energy storage system (ESS) such as lithium ion batteries (LiB) in marine vessels is limited to battery hybrid vessels with highly variable load profiles and all-electric vessels on short routes. In the case of battery hybrid vessels this is true because the economic benefit of the ESS is derived mostly from load-leveling, peak-shaving and spinning reserve functionality.

The first two functions in particular are more pronounced in a vessel that must respond to high variation in propulsion loads. It is in these vessels that the economic benefit of the ESS likely provides a sufficient return on the cost of the ESS at today’s LiB pricing.

Examples of vessels with highly variable load profiles are tug boats, offshore supply vessels and short haul ferries where the generators are typically sized to handle a certain peak load that is significantly higher than the average load required. A harbour tug, for instance, may have generators that can produce over 7,000 HP for an 80-ton bollard pull in ship assist mode, yet the tug spends less than 10% of its time at or near this full bollard pull rating.

A similar situation exists in offshore vessels in dynamic positioning mode where thrusters must respond rapidly to maintain vessel position against wind and waves. In both cases, with a hybrid ESS arrangement, the generators can be sized smaller or be fewer in number to handle the base load and let the ESS shave the peaks or level the load on the generators. This reduces fuel consumption, emissions, and wear and tear on the engines. As a vessel’s propulsion load profile becomes flatter, the cost savings diminish relative to the cost of the ESS. Think of a long haul cargo vessel; once it leaves the harbour, it steadily steams across a vast sea for days at a relatively constant speed. It can therefore be seen that for hybrid vessel adoption, the cost of the ESS is a constraining factor.

As mentioned above, all-electric vessel adoption is currently limited to short routes with modest energy requirements. As in electric cars, the range in electric ships is limited by the capacity (typically measured in kWh or MWh) of energy storage that is feasible to install onboard. Feasibility is currently limited by ESS cost or physical size. That is, beyond a certain battery capacity, either the costs exceed the savings to such a degree that it is not a financially viable solution, or the volume or weight of the battery system becomes too large to accommodate in the vessel design.

Once these challenges are resolved, there is also a secondary issue of recharging such a large battery quickly enough to maintain a useful schedule for passengers or for other operational requirements.

Some very smart engineers are working on scaling up charging infrastructure to handle repeated large power transfers, but this is also currently a limitation of the battery cells themselves. In addition, electrical grid infrastructure in the ports of call will need to be able to deliver the required energy many times throughout the day.

Therefore, for all-electric vessels to become commonplace we need not only have  improvements in battery cost but also performance with respect to energy density and recharge rates. These improvements are mostly required at the battery cell level. At Corvus, our job is to create energy storage systems from these cells that do not de-rate the performance of the cells, but instead, harnesses their full potential.

Energy density, charge rates, cell cost and many other factors have all improved dramatically in the five years Corvus has been marketing maritime ESS products, and these trends are continuing, if not quickening. As improvements in density, performance and cost are commercialised, we will see adoption grow to include electric ferries (and other vessels) of ever increasing route length. Compare the first electric ferries in Norway, the MF Ampere and MF Folgefonn, owned by Norled AS, with crossings of 5.6 km and 6 km, respectively, to the more recently announced projects, Aero Ferry (up to 24 km) and HH Ferries’ MF Tycho Brahe and MF Aurora (24-hour operation, 50,000 passengers/9,000 cars per day) to see this is already happening. We will also see hybridisation extend into longer haul vessels such as coastal cargo vessels and eventually freighters.

‘For all-electric vessels to become commonplace we need not only improvements in battery cost but also performance with respect to energy density and recharge rates. These improvements are mostly required at the battery cell level’

Corvus’ approach to managing the complexities of the required technology improvements in energy storage whilst turning a profit in the here-and-now was to create an extensible technology platform comprised of the safest possible battery pack mechanical and electrical design, combined with a battery management system (BMS) refined over seven years.

The term ‘battery cell agnostic’ is overused and so we avoid it; what we do is incorporate the best available cell technology for a given application into our mechanical, electrical and software backbone. We have just come out with two new products and have two more on our roadmap, each using a different cell. The extensible platform concept serves us well and is a good way of looking at adapting to the needs of the market longitudinally in time.

We also look at it laterally with the goal of optimising total cost for a given application by offering enough breadth in our product line. Even amongst the vessel types that are installing ESS today, there are differing requirements for what the products must do. These differences are mostly in terms of whether the vessel needs an ESS that can discharge evenly over an extended period of time – think all electric ferry – or whether the vessel needs an ESS that can absorb/support large fleeting transient power loads – think offshore supply vessel dynamically positioning next to a drill rig in rough weather. These needs can be arranged along a power to energy continuum and we build a product for each case along the continuum. In some applications, like mobile drilling rigs, which are like floating cities, a number of different products are required to optimally serve the multiple use cases onboard.

In the future, as adoption extends to vessels with longer range, there will be a need to scale up the maritime ESS from current levels to something two to three times as large. The largest marine ESS installation in the works so far is approximately 4 MWh. The challenges of scaling up to the 10 MWh-plus level is not so much a matter of BMS scalability or system architecture, as these sizes have been achieved already in stationary power (i.e. electricity grid) ESS applications. For maritime ESS, there is a higher standard of care around safety, especially with respect to thermal runaway (TR) .

Thermal runaway is an extremely rare situation that can occur with batteries, especially LiB, where a faulty or damaged cell can catch fire resulting in a cascading thermal reaction, if uncontrolled. The difference between a containerised battery system in a remote wind farm going into TR and the same thing happening on a ship with passengers and crew many miles offshore underscores the need. It is challenging to scale up with respect to TR safety. Therefore, Corvus puts a lot of resources into leading the market with respect to TR prevention and mitigation. In the extremely unlikely event it becomes necessary, our new products actually limit TR to a single cell, isolating the reaction before it can cascade. The only sensible strategy for TR safety is to limit as much as possible the amount of energy in the reaction.

Commercialising energy storage technology is not for the faint of heart and many challenges remain to be solved. Our belief is that with the right technology and product strategy, as well as sound relationships with the customer base and regulatory bodies, we put ourselves in good stead. We look forward to the future and are excited to see the development of smart energy usage aboard the world’s fleets.

Read more: www.bunkerspot.com/images/mags/flipbook/bs_v13n3_JunJul_16/index.html#p=64

 

Next Generation Orca Energy ESS to power fish farm support vessel

Next Generation Orca Energy ESS to power fish farm support vessel

Corvus Energy’s next generation Orca Energy ESS has been selected by GMV to power an all-electric fish farm support vessel to operate with zero emissions

Richmond, B.C. – June 22, 2016 – Grovfjord Mek. Verksted AS (GMV) has selected Corvus Energy as the supplier of the lithium ion based energy storage system (ESS) for a fish farm support vessel called GMV ZERO. GMV will utilize Corvus’ next generation Orca Energy ESS to support the vessel’s entire energy requirements for zero emission fish farm operation.

Orca Energy is part of the recently announced Orca ESS product line from Corvus which is specifically designed for maritime applications. “Our teams take great pride in the fact that our products are being applied to projects such as this one, with the goal of zero emission operations”, said Roger Rosvold, Sales Manager at Corvus. “In the past, there was a trade off between financial feasibility and environmental responsibility. That is no longer the case with the Orca ESS product line.” In addition to its compelling total cost of installation and the purpose built performance characteristics, the Orca product line also includes significant safety innovations. One such innovation is cell-level thermal runaway isolation which does not require an active cooling technique, such as liquid cooling, for it to be effective. With numerous leading innovations, Orca ESS is quickly becoming the industry’s safest & highest performing maritime ESS solution.

“As a result of an extensive evaluation, GMV selected Corvus’ Orca Energy ESS due to its ability to not only meet, but exceed all performance, safety and financial requirements”, said Arnold Hansen, GMV. “Beyond the incredible benefits of Orca ESS, GMV wanted a partner with extensive marine ESS experience, a global support team, and deep technical knowledge. Corvus is that partner.”

As the leading manufacturer of energy storage systems for maritime applications, Corvus designed and built the Orca ESS solutions portfolio based on the experience from 50+ vessels utilizing a Corvus ESS, totaling over 35MWh and 1 million operating hours. Rather than a single product, the Orca ESS product line delivers a range of products which are designed to meet the needs of various marine customers. Orca Energy is ideal for applications that require large amounts of energy such as ferries and merchant vessels, while Orca Power has been designed for applications that require a seamless response to dynamic power loads such as offshore supply vessels and port equipment.

About Corvus Energy

Corvus Energy provides high power energy storage in the form of modular lithium ion battery systems. Its purpose built, field proven battery systems provide sustained power to hybrid and fully electric heavy industrial equipment, including large marine propulsion drives. For more information, please visit www.corvusenergy.com.

Media Contact:
Sean Puchalski

VP Strategic Marketing and Accounts
(604) 227-0280 ext. 123
spuchalski@corvusenergy.com

Industry Insight: Marine Battery Technology a Promising Solution for Tightening At-Berth Emissions Regs

Industry Insight: Marine Battery Technology a Promising Solution for Tightening At-Berth Emissions Regs

Industry Insight: Marine Battery Technology a Promising Solution for Tightening At-Berth Emissions Regs
Corvus’ batteries are currently in use in a variety of vessels.

Even industry leaders like Canada-based Corvus Energy Inc. (Corvus) say we are many years away from all-electric, battery powered, deep sea ocean going vessels, but in the meantime, battery technology could play a significant role in helping operators with the increasingly important issue of at-berth emissions regulation compliance, the marine battery manufacturer has told Ship & Bunker.

 

With a 5 megawatt load, getting an hour of power will cost some $4 million to $6 million

Sean Puchalski, VP Strategic Marketing and Accounts, Corvus Energy

“People are starting to talk about it now, specifically using battery power to deal with at-berth emissions,” Sean Puchalski, VP Strategic Marketing and Accounts, told Ship & Bunker.

“I think that this is an area that is going to develop before we see long haul ocean going vessels using battery power exclusively for propulsion.”

The reason for this becomes clear when the current costs and power considerations are seen in detail.

 “Once the cost of not only the battery, but all the other gear – power conversion, energy management system, electrical distribution systems and so on – are taken into account, at the moment the cost is around $750,000 to $1 million per megawatt hour,” says Puchalski.

“With a 5 megawatt load, getting an hour of power will cost some $4 million to $6 million.”

As a sign of how much progress is being made in this area though, this cost is significantly less than the $7 million to $9 million it would have cost just two years ago.

In terms of size, Puchalski says current density allows for 3 megawatt hours in a standard 40-foot container.

Taking all this into account, right now he says the “biggest bang for your buck” is for short routes, and hybrid operating vessels, with the technology particularly attractive for offshore markets and ferries.

“Offshore vessels, tugs, and short haul ferries have a highly variable load profile, average power is typically much less than total generator capacity,” says Puchalski.

“These situations benefit significantly from energy storage already at today’s costs and densities.”

At-Berth Emissions Regulations

But the suitability for at-berth regulation compliance is equally clear, with the issue coming under increasing scrutiny in recent times.

This has been particularly so for the cruise sector, which over the last year alone has been subject to public concern over the matter in Australia, the UK, Spain, and the US.

Even outside of the regulations, some operators not even in the general public’s eye are making voluntary at-berth emissions reductions

And at-berth emissions regulations are tightening; in addition to general emissions control area (ECA) regulations in Europe and North America, since January 2014 California has had rules in place mandating the use of at-berth shore power, while in Asia, over the last year Hong Kong and Shanghai / the Yangtze River Delta have introduced at-berth bunker rules.

Even outside of the regulations, some operators not even in the general public’s eye are making voluntary at-berth emissions reductions.

Wallenius Wilhelmsen Logistics (WWL) are a case in point, who last month launched a new policy that requires all of its vessels to burn bunkers with a less than 0.1 percent sulfur content, or an equivalent method of compliance, while at berth in any port around the world.

With technology such as Becker Marine Systems‘ (Becker Marine) liquefied natural gas (LNG)-powered cold ironing barge (Hummel) also already in service, and looking at how far the industry has come in its emissions regulations over the last decade, it is not inconceivable that in the next 10 years we will see requirements for zero emission port calls.

Marine battery technology can clearly play a pivotal role in making such a scenario a reality.

Read more: http://shipandbunker.com/news/features/industry-insight/804083-industry-insight-marine-battery-technology-a-promising-solution-for-tightening-at-berth-emissions-regs

Boeing’s Mega UUV Uses Corvus Lithium Ion Energy Storage System (ESS)

Boeing’s Mega UUV Uses Corvus Lithium Ion Energy Storage System (ESS)

photo-boeing-60220
Photo: Boeing

Boeing recently announced the addition of Echo Voyager to its fleet of unmanned undersea vehicles (UUVs) developed by their research and development division, Phantom Works. Echo Voyager is the largest of the innovative UUV family, joining the Echo Seeker and Echo Ranger. Echo Voyager is capable of operating autonomously at sea for months at a time due to its hybrid rechargeable power system supported by a lithium-ion energy storage solution from Corvus Energy.

By Michelle Howard

Unlike typical UUVs such as the 18-foot Echo Ranger and 32-foot Echo Seeker, which can stay at sea for only a few days before being re-charged by a surface ship, the 51-foot Echo Voyager can explore the oceans for up to 6 months without returning to a support ship. This extreme capability is enabled, in part, by the Corvus-developed energy storage system (ESS). The ESS powers Echo Voyager for a few days before using an onboard diesel generator to recharge the batteries.

Echo Voyager represents the second UUV project of which Corvus technology has been an integral part.

“Corvus is known largely for its product lines for merchant vessels, offshore vessels and port cranes.  We have been an extremely proud contributor to Boeing’s UUV programs for several years now and are excited to be able to share this news with the industry” says Corvus President & CEO Andrew Morden.  “This bespoke work highlights the capabilities and depth of our R&D teams and gives the market some insight into another interesting aspect of our business”.

Echo Voyager will undergo sea trials this summer. Future missions could include scientific, military or oil and gas exploration. It can accomplish these tasks more economically by eliminating the need for a support ship, thanks to its hybrid rechargeable power system, built with Corvus Energy batteries.

Read more: http://www.marinetechnologynews.com/news/boeings-corvus-lithium-533852

Boeing’s New Unmanned Undersea Vehicle uses Corvus Lithium Ion Energy Storage System (ESS)

Boeing’s New Unmanned Undersea Vehicle uses Corvus Lithium Ion Energy Storage System (ESS)

Corvus Energy ESS helps power Boeing’s newly announced Echo Voyager – the latest addition to their fleet of unmanned undersea vehicles (UUV)

Richmond, B.C – June 7, 2016 Boeing recently announced the addition of Echo Voyager to its fleet of unmanned undersea vehicles (UUVs) developed by their research and development division, Phantom Works. Echo Voyager is the largest of the innovative UUV family, joining the Echo Seeker and Echo Ranger. Echo Voyager is capable of operating autonomously at sea for months at a time due to its hybrid rechargeable power system supported by a lithium-ion energy storage solution from Corvus Energy.

Unlike typical UUVs such as the 18-foot Echo Ranger and 32-foot Echo Seeker, which can stay at sea for only a few days before being re-charged by a surface ship, the 51-foot Echo Voyager can explore the oceans for up to 6 months without returning to a support ship. This extreme capability is enabled, in part, by the Corvus-developed energy storage system (ESS). The ESS powers Echo Voyager for a few days before using an onboard diesel generator to recharge the batteries. Echo Voyager represents the second UUV project of which Corvus technology has been an integral part.

“Corvus is known largely for its product lines for merchant vessels, offshore vessels and port cranes.  We have been an extremely proud contributor to Boeing’s UUV programs for several years now and are excited to be able to share this news with the industry” says Corvus President & CEO Andrew Morden.  “This bespoke work highlights the capabilities and depth of our R&D teams and gives the market some insight into another interesting aspect of our business”.

Echo Voyager will undergo sea trials this summer. Future missions could include scientific, military or oil and gas exploration. It can accomplish these tasks more economically by eliminating the need for a support ship, thanks to its hybrid rechargeable power system, built with Corvus Energy batteries. For more information about Echo Voyager please view the news release at http://boeing.mediaroom.com/2016-03-10-Boeing-Unmanned-Undersea-Vehicle-Can-Operate-Autonomously-for-Months

About Corvus Energy
Corvus Energy provides high power energy storage in the form of modular lithium ion battery systems. Its purpose-built, field-proven battery systems provide sustained power to hybrid and fully electric heavy industrial equipment, including large marine propulsion drives. For more information, please visit:  www.corvusenergy.com.

Media Contact:
Sean Puchalski
VP Strategic Marketing and Accounts
(604) 227-0280 ext. 123
spuchalski@corvusenergy.com

Balancing the possible and the practical in regulation

Balancing the possible and the practical in regulation

Paul Fanning_Marine Propulsion1
Paul Fanning

The recent news that Saint Lucia has become the latest flag state to accede the Ballast Water Management Convention will have brought some cheer to IMO, but it comes in the light of some robust criticism from other quarters.

Some of this has come from the International Chamber of Shipping, which used its 2016 Annual Review to criticise IMO’s handling of the Convention, saying: “The main reason why governments have been so reluctant to ratify the Convention has been due to a lack of confidence in the IMO type-approval process and whether, among many other technical questions, the treatment equipment approved in line with current IMO Guidelines would actually work to the satisfaction of Port State Control authorities.”

Another take on this came from Rear Admiral Paul Thomas, US Coast Guard Assistant Commandant for Prevention Policy, who, in a blog posted on the Coast Guard Maritime Commons site, offered a defence of the USCG’s decision to set its own type-approval systems that also amounted to an effective criticism of the IMO’s approach to the ballast water issue.

“Robust, mandatory, consistent and transparent type-approval procedures coupled with testing protocols carried out by independent authorities are critical to ensure the complex systems developed to meet environmental stretch goals are, in fact, reliable and effective. Type-approval procedures that are not mandatory, that can be applied inconsistently, and that are not transparent introduce market uncertainty, and make it difficult for regulators to incentivise ‘early adopters’,” wrote Admiral Thomas.

Read more: http://www.mpropulsion.com/news/view,balancing-the-possible-and-the-practical-in-regulation_43145.htm

 

Corvus Energy solution powers new Scandlines ferry

Corvus Energy solution powers new Scandlines ferry

940420p516EDNmain4480940420p516EDNmainScandlines-Berlin-credit-Claus-Lillevang_940x443Berlin operates between Rostock and Gedser (Image: Claus Lillevang)

By Rebecca Gibson

Scandlines’ newly launched hybrid ferry, Berlin, uses a low-emission and fuel-saving diesel electric hybrid propulsion system powered by an energy storage system (ESS) from Corvus Energy.

Berlin, which was christened on 3 May, is the fifth Scandlines hybrid ferry to use a Corvus ESS, which provides 6,000kW of the total 15,800kW of power needed by its engines. This allows the ferry to operate at a speed of 20.5 knots on her two-hour crossing between Rostock, Germany and Gedser, Denmark.

The vessel is also equipped with various other energy-saving technologies including an optimised propulsion system consisting of propellers and two thrusters, as well as LED lighting. Any excess energy is stored in the Corvus ESS so it can be released when Berlin’s energy consumption is higher than generator production.

Read more: http://www.cruiseandferry.net/articles/corvus-energy-solution-powers-new-scandlines-ferry#.V1DXeuRCi2W